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rocketseason
31 December 2009 @ 10:21 am


Alright I lied, one more post.

About six months ago I started a little webcomic called "Robot Beach". Now, I honestly know very little about making comics, but reading them has been a long time passion of mine and I thought that by starting my own, well, it might be a fun way to get to writing and drawing on a regular basis again.

Turns out I really enjoy making comics! And it looks like I will be doing this for the foreseeable future so, head on over and leave a comment letting me know what you think!

http://www.robotbeach.com
 
 
rocketseason
15 November 2008 @ 12:15 pm
Hello.

I was planning to use this site as a way to quickly update a few of my friends about the recent work I had been producing. However, it appears as if they are no longer really using this site, and so, neither will I.

If you do stumble across this post, you can always find my latest work by visiting my blog: http://www.houseofmove.com I update this site quite often so stop on by and leave a comment!

I also have a facebook page. Just search for Matt Forcum in Peoria.

a flickr account: http://flickr.com/photos/rocketseason/

and a Vimeo account: http://vimeo.com/mattforcum/videos

Thanks, see you later!

-Matt Forcum
 
 
rocketseason
10 October 2008 @ 06:51 pm


Many of you have been asking how Annabelle's Bistro has been going and unfortunately, I have been unable to let a lot of information out of the bag in recent months. Now that all the details have been worked out, and production is in full swing, I can reassure everyone that the film is alive and well...and better than ever!

I am an instructor in the Multimedia department at Bradley University, and recently the department expressed interest in producing the film at the university. This was an opportunity that I simply could not pass up. The only thing I love more than animation is teaching, and getting the chance to do both and have it relate directly to Annabelle's Bistro is amazing! We have many talented students in the program and with their help, this film will become something that it would never had been had I continued to plug away on my own.

I have secured the domain annabelles-bistro.com. This will serve as a spot on the web for the film to live. The site will contain quite a few cool features including a detailed production blog maintained by everyone working on the film. Look for that to go live in early December.

In addition, two of my students are producing The Official Annabelle's Bistro Podcast. This will be a weekly podcast which will chronicle the production of the short film. It is up and available now so feel free to follow along as we work diligently to complete the film by June 1st, 2009. (yikes!)
 
 
rocketseason
11 September 2008 @ 03:04 pm

Ok, I am sitting here and watching South Park, drinking a nice glass of wine, and revising my treatment…again…

I showed it to my boss and friend Jim Ferolo and he came back with a few suggestions. Mainly that my main characters motivation for his actions later on in the piece were pretty vague. Which sucks because its SO important to the story that the audience gets whats going on in the mind of the Man right away.

It is absolutely necessary to get this moment right in the film. And its tough, because conveying to the audience that the main character wishes to be left alone is more difficult than it sounds. I had been using his interaction with the waiter as the moment to reveal this character trait to the audience but its a brief moment that can easily be missed, miss-read, or simply ignored. Whats more, It’s a moment that relies so heavily on subtle and well-executed animation, that its really quite scary to consider the consequences should I get that moment wrong.

So, to solve these problems and solidify the Man’s desire to be left alone I needed to re-write a couple of the characters introductions a bit. I needed to give the Man an opportunity to engage in a conversation. An opportunity which he so rudely chooses to ignore. Which lead me to re-consider how I am introducing the Old Woman.

Before I made the change, The two key characters introductions read like this:

A man sits alone in front of a small bistro reading a newspaper and enjoying a fine glass of wine. He is thin and smartly dressed wearing a nice brown suit. A handkerchief is carefully folded and placed neatly in his breast pocket. He is relaxed and there is a smile on his face, yet his heavy eyes are tired from stress. He is enjoying the calm, fresh air and the quiet afternoon. Clearly he would rather be left alone.

Sitting at another table just behind the Man is an Old Woman. She has a small birdcage containing a little red bird placed on the table in front of her. She is smiling and talking quietly to the bird as she carefully sips soup from a bowl placed in-between the two of them.

Abruptly, an overweight waiter bursts through the front door of the restaurant carrying a plate with a sandwich and a glass of wine. The waiter walks to the Man’s table and places the food down in front of him. The Man, delighted to see his food has arrived, folds his paper carefully and tucks a napkin into his collar.

“Will there be anything else sir?” The waiter asks politely. The Man waves his hand in dismissal, and the waiter bows slightly and walks away.

Having made the adjustments, The introductions now reads like this:

A man sits alone in front of a small bistro reading a newspaper and enjoying a fine glass of wine. He is thin and smartly dressed wearing a nice brown suit. A handkerchief is carefully folded and placed neatly in his breast pocket. He is relaxed and there is a smile on his face, yet his heavy eyes are tired from stress. He is enjoying the calm, fresh air and the quiet afternoon.

The Man looks up from his paper for a brief moment and realizes that he is being watched.

Sitting at a table just across from the Man is an Old Woman. She has a small birdcage containing a little red bird placed on the table in front of her. She is smiling and looking up at him.

“Bonjour!” she says and with a pleasant grin on her face. The man does not respond. Instead, he returns to his paper, lifting it higher in front of his face to block her from his view.

The Old Woman, put off by the Mans reaction to her, shoots him a dirty look. She then turns to the little bird in the cage and begins talking quietly to it as she carefully sips soup from a bowl placed in-between the two of them.

Abruptly, an overweight waiter bursts through the front door of the restaurant carrying a plate with a sandwich and a glass of wine. The waiter walks to the Man’s table and places the food down in front of him. The Man, delighted to see his food has arrived, folds his paper carefully and tucks a napkin into his collar.

“Will there be anything else sir?” The waiter asks politely. The man waves his hand in dismissal, and the waiter bows slightly and walks away.

Making these changes have not only strongly established my main character, but it has also given me the added benefit of strengthening the Old Woman and giving her a more important role in the film, which is great because it gives her final moment a bit more spice which I am sure the audience will appreciate.

So the point of this fairly long posting is as follows: You need to set your characters up before you knock them down. Spend time with your script. Serious time. Hours of serious time. Seperate yoursef from your story a bit and approach it as if you were an audience member seeing the material for the first time. Ask yourself, “Does this make sense from the beginning, to the middle, to the end? Do the characters feel like they are acting and reacting in a way that is consistent with their personalities?”

And most importantly, show your script to others who might be able to point out the obvious to you. It is good to have confidence in your work, but as tight as you think your script is, there is always something to be done that can make it better.

 
 
rocketseason
21 May 2008 @ 04:31 pm

I sat down the other night to write a finally write a treatment for my animated short: Annabelle’s Bistro. There was a Woot-Off going on while I was writing it and I ended up buying a Roomba. (That is a story for a different time perhaps.)

Anyway, 3 beers and 3 1/2 painful hours later I ended up with a treatment that was 3 pages long. Much longer than a treatment for a three minute short needs to be, yet not quite detailed enough to be what I would consider a script. So I have a hybrid here which I call a Scriptment. (Not a term of my own invention. James Cameron gets to claim that prize.)

I actually don’t think a full script will be necessary now. This is detailed enough that I can probably take this and go right to storyboards. And considering that dialogue is rather light, a full script probably wouldn’t do me much more good than this does anyway.

So feel free to read the first page of my Scriptment! I am going to keep the other 2 pages to myself because I am not sure I want to give out spoilers just yet. Enjoy!

ANNABELLE’S BISTRO
Treatment by: Matt Forcum
5-8-08 revised: 5-20-08

EXT. SMALL FRENCH BISTRO

It is a crisp spring day. A warm sun shines down brightly on a small town in southern France. The town is awake and full of life. Windows are open and soft music fills the air. Birds chirp as they pass overhead and butterflies can be seen visiting small flower boxes.

A man sits alone in front of a small bistro reading a newspaper and enjoying a fine glass of wine. He is thin and smartly dressed wearing a nice brown suit. A handkerchief is carefully folded and placed neatly in his breast pocket. He is relaxed and there is a smile on his face, yet his heavy eyes are tired from stress. He is enjoying the calm, fresh air and the quiet afternoon. Clearly he would rather be left alone.

Sitting at another table just behind the Man is an Old Woman. She has a small birdcage containing a little red bird placed on the table in front of her. She is smiling and talking quietly to the bird as she carefully sips soup from a bowl placed in-between the two of them.

Abruptly, an overweight waiter bursts through the front door of the restaurant carrying a plate with a sandwich and a glass of wine. The waiter walks to the Man’s table and places the food down in front of him. The Man, delighted to see his food has arrived, folds his paper carefully and tucks a napkin into his collar.

“Will there be anything else sir?” The waiter asks politely. The man waves his hand in dismissal, and the waiter bows slightly and walks away.

As the waiter opens the front door of the restaurant to walk back inside, a small, purple basset hound pushes her way past the waiter and runs out the door in the direction of the man.

Lifting the glass of wine from the table, the man brings it to his nose. He inhales the sweet aroma then prepares to take a drink. Just as the glass touches his lips, a small “Bark! Bark!” startles him and he looks down to find the basset at his feet wagging her tail and staring up at him with a big, happy grin on her face. He smiles, pats the dog lightly on the head, and gently nudges her away…

-Matt

p.s.  For more info on Annabelle's Bistro, please visit my site at HouseofMove.com
 
 
 
rocketseason
17 March 2008 @ 09:28 am




For the old timers out there, this may be a bit of a surprise, but hopefully it’s a pleasing one. After six years of service, RocketSeason.com is no more. Welcome to The House of Move.

This blog is DEDICATED to the art of animation. Gone are the random posts that have nothing to do with anything. (although you can still find them in the archives.) This is your daily resource for all things HOT in the world of animation. And not necessarily the latest news out there. Just stuff that I find interesting or noteworthy. I also intend to use this site as a journal to document progress on my animated short: Annabelle’s Bistro.

There will be more changes in the days to come, A new logo (what you see in the header now is temporary) as well as a few added features. So please update your bookmarks, and brace yourself for a giant load of awesome!

Comments? You know where to leave ‘em. Enjoy!

-Matt
 
 
rocketseason
13 February 2008 @ 02:22 pm
When things get busy at work, my physical appearance starts going downhill.




-Matt

RocketSeason.com
 
 
rocketseason
05 February 2008 @ 11:21 am
I have some very cool news. I entered a LEGO builders contest on FBTB.net. The contest is to re-imagine the Star Wars universe in the style of Steampunk.
There have been alot of great entries and a few have been highlighted by popular blogs. I was lucky enough to see my entry get posted on the front of Gizmodo.




This has been a very cool contest, and alot of very talented people have gotten some big-time attention because of it. Be sure to check it out as everyone starts submitting their final entries. The contest judging begins the first of February. You can check out more photos of my entry here.

-Matt
 
 
rocketseason
24 December 2007 @ 10:23 am


My daughter, Georgia Kay Forcum, was born on 12-16-07 at 10:28 a.m. She weighed in at 5lbs, 8 oz and 18 inches long.

More pictures can be seen by clicking here.

-Matt
 
 
rocketseason
09 October 2007 @ 02:37 pm


The Company I work for was hired to shoot an interview with George Lucas and some b-roll footage of the opening of the new Star Wars exhibit at the Museum of Science and Industry.

I spent 2 hours in the exhibit with George Lucas after it closed down for the day.  I shook his hand and thanked him for everything.  It was one of the greatest moments of my life.  And not just because of the whole Star Wars thing.  George is responsible for most of the modern tools I use on a daily basis.  He has inspired millions of scientists, engineers, teachers, doctors, and artists.  Heck, his work is what inspired me to get into animation in the first place.  And I meet him!

This particular image came from a special session he had with a group of high school students. This is the only good shot I have of him and I in the same frame. So I at least have proof.

I also got to interview Anthony Daniels.  He was a very nice guy.  Both of them were very nice. George spoke for 2 hours on different topics related to star wars, filmmaking, and following your dreams.  It was a very rare and precious experience and I will never forget it.

Check out my flickr page for more Pics!  I don't think I can post any of the video I shot...I will check on that.

-Matt